close

Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Koetsuji Temple 光悦寺

A temple that conveys the soul of the tea ceremony

While more applicable to its namesake temple, Koetsuji can also refer to this neighborhood in northwest Kyoto, home to an important artistic community in the 17th century.

Don't Miss

  • Strolling among seven teahouses of differing styles
  • Visiting in autumn, since the temple is renowned for the vibrant red of its autumn leaves

How to Get There

You can reach Koetsuji by train and then by bus.

Kita-oji bus terminal can be reached via the Karasuma subway line from Kyoto Station to Kita-oji Station. From there, take the Kita #1 bus to the Takagamine Genkoan-mae bus stop. Koetsuji is a two-minute walk from there.

Quick Facts

The area was developed in 1615, on land given by shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu

Koetsuji was named after Honami Koetsu, a famous calligrapher, ceramic artist and master of tea ceremony in the early Edo period

A change in purpose

Koetsuji Temple was originally a mausoleum for the Honami family but was converted to a Nichiren temple in 1656 after Koetsu's death.

One of the three master calligraphers of the Kan-ei era

One of the most important calligraphers of his era, Koetsu was considered one of the three master calligraphers of the Kan-ei era (1624-1644).

Many of his works are displayed in the treasure house of the temple, along with some of his other works, such as paintings, teacups, and wooden statues. Many are Important Cultural Properties of Japan. There are also some old maps of the Koetsuji area.

A passion for tea

The garden reflects Koetsu's passion for tea. Unattached to a single tea style, he freely adopted ideas from various schools and applied them in his own way. There are seven teahouses on the premises, including the Taikyo-an and Sanpa-tei.

One unexpected highlight of the temple is the crisscrossed bamboo fence, known as Koetsu-gaki. Koetsu's tomb can also be found on the grounds, which also offer views over Kyoto city. This meticulously arranged and well-maintained garden truly conveys the soul of the tea ceremony.

  • HOME
  • Koetsuji Temple