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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Attraction

Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum 新横浜ラーメン博物館

Yokohama's underground ramen theme park takes you back to the Japan of yesteryear

The Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum was the world's first food-themed amusement park. Come here to sample and learn about the famous noodle soup created in China and perfected in Japan by trying ramen from across the country, housed in a picture-perfect recreation of post-War Japan streets.

Don't Miss

  • Sampling mini-bowls of ramen from nine different famous places like Hakata, Sapporo, and Kitakata
  • Enjoying some toy slot-car racing
  • Taking home yummy noodles and chic tableware

How to Get There

The museum is a 5-minute walk from Shin-Yokohama Station.

Shin-Yokohama is served by the Tokaido Shinkansen, the JR Yokohama Line, and the Yokohama Municipal Subway's Blue Line. Alternatively, from Yokohama Station, take the Blue Line to Shin-Yokohama Station and walk about 5 minutes to the museum.

A shuttle bus can take you to Shin-Yokohama from Narita Airport in 2 hours and from Haneda Airport in 45 minutes. Tokyo Station is 50 minutes away via the JR Tokaido Line and Yokohama Municipal Subway, and Shinjuku Station is also 50 minutes away via the Tokyu Toyoko and JR Yamanote and Yokohama lines— all covered by your JR rail pass.

A whole world of ramen to discover

Instant noodles were invented in Japan in 1958, marking an important landmark in Japanese culinary culture. To celebrate the time just before this invention burst onto the scene, and after which street-side noodle shops were everywhere you looked, the two basement floors of the museum house a replica of Tokyo's downtown "shitamachi" area as it looked in 1958.

With its perpetual sunset, retro posters, and fuzzy radio, the museum is a rare chance to experience Japan as it was decades ago.

The museum gallery on the first floor provides details on the history and production of ramen noodles. Exhibits display ingredients and information on how to produce the noodles from scratch.

Sample regional cuisine in the nostalgic sunset streets

Tucked away in these recreated streets are nine restaurants offering different types of ramen from around Japan. Each shop offers a mini version of their featured ramen, allowing you to sample more than one if you wish. If there's a regional ramen you're hoping to try, but can't make the journey out this trip, the authentic tastes showcased in the Raumen Museum have you covered.

To order, simply buy a ticket from the vending machine in front of each shop. Vegetarian and non-pork options are available.

Charming retro recreation

Adding to the authentic Showa-era 20th-century atmosphere of the museum is the slot-car race track, a hobby that was popular in Japan in the 1960s. Children and adults alike can rent toy cars here to race on the 30-meter long course.

Another throwback you'll find along the two floors of the Sunset Shopping Street are the old-fashioned candy and toy stores like those Japanese children often visited on their way home from school generations ago. More than 300 types of sweets and toys are available for purchase.

More than just noodles

Tired of ramen? The museum's retro cafe has snacks and a variety of drinks on offer, from coffee to Japanese whisky. Their Hokkaido-style soft-serve ice cream is particularly popular.

Stop by the museum shop on your way out to pick up a variety of instant noodles based on famous regional ramen, soup bowls, and chopsticks. You can also make your own style of ramen or sweets to take home.

Come and go as you please

Same-day re-entry is allowed. Just show your ticket at the gate when you leave to get your hand stamped.

Set aside a couple of hours to enjoy the museum at your leisure. The Raumen Museum is a particularly good stop for a lunch break on a rainy or excessively hot day.

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