close

Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

TOHOKU Fukushima Samurai, snow and sake: Japan’s soul in one land

Easily reached from Tokyo, Fukushima has everything Japan is famous for, including relaxing onsen, sake, cherry blossoms and powder-covered mountain slopes

Fostering unique traditions of food and culture, the fertile lands of Fukushima produce some of Japan's best fruit and sake. Nature is abundant here, and southern suburbanites have long been drawn to its famed onsen and pristine wilderness. More recently, winter sports enthusiasts have discovered Fukushima's charms. While the 2011 earthquake and tsunami hit the region hard, tourism has bounced right back, thanks to local spirit—as expected from people in the northern heartland of samurai culture.

How to Get There

Fukushima is easily accessible from Tokyo via the JR Tohoku Shinkansen, as well as regular JR trains, highway buses and by car. If you're coming from further south, such as Kyoto, take the JR Tokaido Shinkansen to Tokyo before transferring. Fukushima Airport serves as the regional airport hub.

Fukushima is on the direct JR line from Tokyo, about 1 hour 30 minutes away. For other destinations like Aizuwakamatsu and the Urabandai area, including Inawashiro, transfers to local trains or buses at Koriyama usually take about 2 hours and 30 minutes. Fukushima Airport has domestic service to Osaka and Sapporo (ANA, JAL, Ibex Air) and one international route to Seoul (Asiana).

Show more details

Don't Miss

    The aquamarine colors of Goshikinuma's mineral lakes
    Powder-perfect ski fields in Urabandai
    Samurai history and culture in the medieval castle town of Aizuwakamatsu
    The famous hula girls at Iwaki’s Spa Hawaiians Resort—Japan’s first theme park

Reference Link

Explore Fukushima by Area

SEE ALL

Trending Attractions in Fukushima

Local Specialties

Seasonal Highlights

  • Spring

    New sake debuts in March. Home to the nation’s most beloved cherry tree, Fukushima offers some of Japan’s best cherry blossom-viewing possibilities.

  • Summer

    Summer in Fukushima means festivals, with Soma’s samurai horseback racing event—one of the nation's most unique. Juicy peaches and cherries are sweet news for food lovers, while others come for the hiking, surf and sand.

  • Autumn

    Fall in Fukushima is a colorful affair, with the Bandai Azuma Skyline awash in golds and reds. The festival season continues, while seasonal delicacies such as pears and grapes abound.

  • Winter

    The slopes of Mt. Bandai are ready for skiers and snowboarders, and nearby onsen are ideal spots to recover from a day carving through it all. Year-end festivals and illumination brighten the days and nights.

Visitor Photos

Share your travel photos with us by hashtagging your images with #visitjapanjp