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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Daigoji Temple 醍醐寺

The creme de la creme of Buddhist temples

Daigoji Temple was built in the ninth century and later restored in the 16th century by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, then the supreme leader of Japan. Its name has an unusual but logical meaning, as described below.

How to Get There

The temple is accessible by train and then on foot or by taxi.

From Kyoto Station , take the Tokaido-Sanyo Line to Yamashina Station and transfer to the Tozai Line. Get off at Daigo Station. It's a 13-minute walk from there.

A name to live up to

Daigo translates to ghee, or clarified butter. This metaphorically translates to "ultimate truth" in Buddhism, as this Nirvana sutra illustrates: "From cows to fresh milk; fresh milk to cream; cream to curdled milk; curdled milk to butter; butter to ghee. Ghee is the best." Daigoji is thus named for this most enlightened of states.

A mountain temple

One of the largest temple complexes in all of Kyoto, Daigoji spreads across the entire expanse of Mt. Daigo in the southeast of Kyoto. It is divided into three parts: the Sambo-in and the Shimo-Daigo at the bottom of the mountain, and the Kami-Daigo at the top. The complex has more than 80 buildings.

The oldest structure in the city

At the bottom of the mountain you will find the kondo, or main hall, and a five-story pagoda, both designated National Treasures. Built in 951, the pagoda has the distinction of being the oldest surviving structure in Kyoto .

Take a hike up the mountain

Sanpo-in and Shimo-Daigo are easy to get to, so they draw the biggest crowds. In contrast, getting to Kami-Daigo isn't for the faint of heart. Located at the top of Mt. Daigo, you must endure a rather strenuous hike to reach it, but you will be rewarded by the lack of crowds, a serene atmosphere, and beautiful buildings and gardens.

Daigoji has been famous for its cherry blossoms ever since Toyotomi Hideyoshi famously restored it.

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