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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Visa Information

Any foreign visitor entering Japan must have a valid passport for the duration of their stay, and all visitors must comply with the conditions of their visas. See below for commonly asked questions about Japan visa requirements.

Do I need a visa for Japan?

Citizens of 68 countries coming to Japan for tourism purposes including Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA, UK and almost all European nations don't require a visa (rules and conditions apply ) and will be granted permission for short-term stay upon arrival.

Visitors from outside these 68 countries must apply for a visa in advance. Click here to link to the official Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan website for further information.

Even if you are a citizen of a country that doesn't require a visa, make sure to check the official rules for Japan visa requirements as they can periodically change.

Japanese law requires that all short-term foreign visitors must have proof of onward travel (departure) from Japan.

All short-term foreign visitors to Japan are photographed and fingerprinted upon arrival and must carry their passport with them in Japan at all times.

Working and engaging in paid activities on a short-term stay visa is strictly forbidden.

How long can I stay in Japan without a visa?

Japan immigration laws state that visitors from 68 countries are able to travel in Japan for up to 90 days without a visa:

Stays of up to 15 days: Brunei, Indonesia, Thailand

Stays of up to 30 days: United Arab Emirates

Stays of up to 90 days: other countries and regions

This is provided visitors have a valid passport for the duration of their stay and don't engage in any paid work or activities.

Citizens of the 68 countries with savings of over 30 million yen are eligible to stay in Japan for up to one year for sightseeing or recreational purposes under the Longer Stays Program. If the applicant's spouse does not apply as an accompanying traveler and wishes to stay separately under this program, the applicant and his/her spouse must own savings equivalent to more than 60 million Japanese yen in total. Children are not allowed to accompany, and other rules apply. Visas must be obtained before traveling to Japan; click here for more information.

Citizens of Austria, Germany, Ireland, Lichtenstein, Mexico, Switzerland, and the UK may extend their stay for another 90 days. Apply at the nearest Japan immigration bureau before the initial 90 days expire and pay a small processing fee. Click here to link to the official Immigration Bureau of Japan website for more information.

I want to work in Japan. How do I apply for a work visa?

Foreign nationals wanting to work in Japan require an appropriate working visa. Japan visa requirements say working or engaging in any paid activities on a short-term stay or tourist visa is strictly forbidden.

Work visas are categorized into different types according to defined professional fields, with each requiring specific experience and qualifications.

A job offer in Japan is required to apply for most types of work visas.

Before a working visa can be issued, you will need a Certificate of Eligibility (COE) from your prospective employer, and approved by the Bureau of Immigration. This document is a preliminary screening process that says holders meet the conditions for landing in Japan and being considered for a visa.

For more information on how to apply for a working visa, click here

Can I get a working holiday visa to Japan?

Citizens of Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Spain, Taiwan, and the UK are all eligible to apply for a working holiday visa to Japan.

The working holiday visa allows an initial six-month stay in Japan, with the possibility of up to two six-month extensions. The purpose of the visa is for travel, but working-holiday visa holders can undertake limited work to supplement their travel funds if necessary.

Eligibility requirements vary according to applicant's age and the maximum number of visas that can be issued per country per year.

Click here for further information on the working holiday visa program

How do I get a student visa to study in Japan?

If you are a citizen of one of the 68 countries with which Japan has a general visa waiver agreement and if you plan on studying at a Japanese language school for under 90 days, you only need a valid passport.

Those who are not citizens of these 68 countries, or those wishing to study and/or train in Japan for longer periods of time, will need to apply for a visa. For further information about studying in Japan and applying for the appropriate visa, please click here

I want to stay longer in Japan. Are there any longer stay programs?

Yes, there are. With the introduction of the Longer Stays Program, it is now possible to stay in Japan for up to one year. To be eligible, foreign nationals and accompanying spouses must be from countries/regions to which Japan implements visa exemption measures—children are not allowed to accompany. Foreign nationals must be over the age of 18, and have savings that equate to 30 million Japanese yen. If the applicant's spouse does not apply as an accompanying traveler and wishes to stay separately under this program, the applicant and his/her spouse must own savings equivalent to more than 60 million Japanese yen in total.

Subscription to a private medical travel insurance policy which covers death, injury and illness during his/her stay. The period of stay is six months. However, it can be extended to one year with a Permission for Extension of Period of Stay (available only once). It is necessary to obtain a specified visa of Designated Activities in advance from Japanese embassies or consulates that exercise jurisdiction over the applicant's domicile to enter Japan under this program.

Foreign nationals who stay for a mid-long term in Japan—including those under this program—are required to go through all relevant procedures at a municipal office . Contact the Immigration Information Center for further information. A multilingual service is available.