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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Explore fishing villages, terraced rice fields and unrivalled coastal drives on Ishikawa's rugged northern peninsula

The Noto Peninsula is a 100-kilometer stretch of land jutting out into the sea making up the northern area of Ishikawa prefecture. A visit to Noto's beautiful stretches of beach, small fishing villages and agricultural interior will mesmerize you and give you a new appreciation for slow-paced life.

Don't Miss

  • Chatting with a friendly vendor at Wajima morning market
  • The tantalizing Noto Kiriko festivals
  • Looking out over the illuminated Senmaida rice fields at dusk
  • Soaking in hot spring waters overlooking the ocean

How to Get There

The most convenient route from Tokyo is by a one-hour flight from Haneda Airport to Noto Airport. The area has a network of local trains and buses for getting around, but the most convenient way to explore Noto is by car.

From Tokyo:

There are two daily flights from Tokyo's Haneda Airport to Noto Airport. At the airport you can rent a car from major Japanese car rental outlets. Buses also connect to Wajima and Anamizu.

By train, take the Hokuriku Shinkansen from Tokyo to Kanazawa. From there, connect to the JR Nanao line on a limited express train to Wakura Onsen. This course is covered by the JR Rail Pass.

From Kanazawa:

Take the JR Nanao line limited express to Wakura Onsen. The journey takes one hour.

Alternatively the Hokutetsu express bus connects Kanazawa to Wajima and takes two to two and a half hours.

Beaches, coastline and geological rock formations

Along the coast of Noto, several stretches of beach offer visitors a place to take in the seascape.

Driving on the flat sands of Chirihama Beach on the southern west coast is sure to be great fun, and the beautiful Koiji Beach in the north is a wonderful spot to enjoy the sunset.

The Ganmon Sea Cave, a geological rock formation created by the rough waters of the Sea of Japan, is a popular stop along any scenic drive or cycling tour.

The peninsula of festivals

Matsuri, or festivals, take place virtually every weekend somewhere in Noto from spring to fall.

The impressive 3-day Seihakusai Dekayama Festival held in May is worth catching. In the summer, the heart-pumping Noto Kiriko Festivals with their large lantern floats will provide you unforgettable memories of the exciting float competitions.

Magnificent scenery

For a breathtaking view of terraced rice paddies, don`t miss a visit to the Senmaida rice fields north of Wajima. At night, the rice paddies are lit up with strings of purple lights, giving it an otherworldly ambience.

Agricultural tourism

If you have some time and would like to gain a deeper understanding of farm life on this rural peninsula, Shunran-no-Sato offers homestay programs focused on green tourism and sustainability. The programs offer unrivaled opportunities to experience rice planting and rice harvesting, as well as mushroom hunting with local farmers.

A soak by the sea

Nearby Nanao City lies the hot spring resort town Wakura Onsen. You will find it along the bay in the center of the peninsula. Here, large ryokan (Japanese-style inn) complexes are equipped with plenty of entertainment and karaoke. The most renowned of these ryokan is Kagaya, ranking in the top 10 of Japan's best ryokan. Wakura onsen is a great spot to sample Japanese onsen culture, next to the calm oceanside of the eastern coast.

A visit to the morning market

The vibrant Wajima Morning Market dates back over 1000 years and offers fresh seafood, produce, snacks and the famous lacquerware of the area. Many of the vendors are elderly women known for their character and grit. Just a short walk from the market is the Wajima Lacquerware Museum, where you can get a sense of the process of creating the highly valued Wajima lacquerware.

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