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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Kasugayama-jinja Shrine 春日山神社

A shrine and ruins atop Mt. Kasuga

Kasugayama Shrine is situated halfway up Mt. Kasuga, where the revered General Uesugi Kenshin from the Warring States period (c. 1465 to 1573) used to reside. This wooden shrine was built by the father of children's literature in Japan, author Ogawa Mimei.

Don't Miss

  • Occasional sword performances by samurai actors in front of the shrine
  • The annual Kenshinko Festival, where hundreds of samurai actors march the streets in Kasugayama
  • The great views of Joetsu City on top of Mt. Kasuga

How to Get There

You can reach the shrine by train and then by bus or car.

After taking the Joetsu Shinkansen to Joetsumyoko Station, take the Main Line to Naoetsu Station. Then, transfer to a Kubiki Bus and get off at the Kasugayama-shita stop. The shrine is a 30-minute walk from there.

The shrine is a 15-minute drive from the Joetsu-Takada Interchange on the Joshinetsu Expressway. Free parking is available at the bottom of the shrine.

Elements in the shrine

On the shrine grounds, you'll find animal statues that are fairytale motifs and relics and documents that belonged to Uesugi Kenshin.

Trekking up the mountain

If you'd like to get in a little exercise, take a hike up to the top of Mt. Kasuga to look over the city of Joetsu. It is not a difficult hike, and the trail passes through important castle ruins dating back to wartime in the Warring States period.

Surrounding attractions

Nearby Rinsenji Temple is worth checking out since that is where Kenshin studied and trained in military arts.

Kenshinko Festival

Every year on the fourth Saturday and Sunday in August, hundreds of samurai actors (volunteers from the city) dress in full armor and march the streets of Kasugayama for the Kenshinko Festival, which commemorates Kenshin.

The highlight of the festival is undoubtedly the reenactment of the Kawanakajima Battle; hundreds of actors and horses are involved in this performance.

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