close

Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Art & Design

Asakura Museum of Sculpture 朝倉文夫記念館

A park that honors Japan's most influential sculptor

Built as a memorial to one of the region's finest and most influential artists, the Fumio Asakura Museum of Sculpture in Oita was once Asakura's house and studio. Asakura established a style called naturalistic realism, and developed his own school, the Asakura School. This extensive park presents some of the sculptor's most renowned works in its hall and on the grounds, as well as pieces from other Asian artists.

Don't Miss

  • The cultural hall, which hosts special exhibitions of art, handicrafts and other creative arts
  • The panorama-viewing platform to see the best of the park
  • Getting in touch with nature at the wild bird sanctuary and nature park

How to Get There

The best way to access the park from Oita Station is by train and then taxi.

From Oita Station, take the Hohi mainline train to Asaji Station. From Asaji Station, the park is a 15-minute ride by car or taxi. Parking is available.

A fitting tribute to a native son

This museum was built to commemorate one of the area's most beloved sons, Fumio Asakura, who is regarded as the father of modern Japanese sculpture. Born in Asaji, Fumio moved to Tokyo to study and produced work that set a precedent for those who would follow. There is also an Asakura Museum of Sculpture in Tokyo. His most popular work is the masterpiece "Grave Keeper," apparently modeled on a grave keeper at Tennoji Temple in Yanaka .

Fulfilling a dream Asakura didn't live to build

Although Asakura always desired to build a rest and recreation area in his hometown, he died in 1964 before he was able to achieve his ambition. Following his passing, the people of Oita got together to create this sculpture park and to make his dream come true. Explore the grounds to find out more about how and why they did it.

Wander through the stunning sculpture hall

The Sculpture Hall houses an impressive collection of over 50 pieces by Asakura, offering a representative cross-section of this prolific artist's most famous works. An incredibly influential figure, Asakura worked for a while as a professor of his alma mater, the Tokyo School of Fine Arts. His body of work and concepts continue to inspire scholars and other artists.

Asakura loved cats, and about a dozen cat sculptures are constantly exhibited in the Ran-no-ma area.

Asian art showcase

Beautiful works by other leading contemporary Asian sculptors are showcased throughout the grounds and the park, including Chinese paintings, calligraphic works and curios. The park is also the site of the popular Oita Asian Sculpture exhibition, which showcases artists from across Asia each year.

Supporting the community

Aside from remembering Asakura and showcasing art, the park serves as a focal point for the town, which thrives on agriculture and tourism. The 16-hectare facility is designed as a place where locals and tourists can relax as Asakura would have wanted, offering a viewing platform, waterside sculptures by the wild bird sanctuary, and a nature park.

The park is also home to a ceramics studio for both study and practical work, which continues to support and inspire budding artists.

  • HOME
  • Asakura Museum of Sculpture