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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings
  • Hokkaido
  • Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill

Nature

Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill 羊ヶ丘展望台

Ishikari plains and flocks of sheep

Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill, on the southeastern side of Sapporo , showcases the Ishikari plains beautifully, juxtaposed with the modern Sapporo Dome. Originally used to raise sheep for the Hokkaido National Agriculture Research facility, visitors now flock to Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill to snap photos.

Don't Miss

  • Taking a picture with the bronze statue of Dr. Clark
  • Sampling a variety of lamb- and mutton-based treats at the Hitsujigaoka Rest House
  • Seasonal highlights, such as lavender in July, and a Snow Park from January to March

Quick Facts

The name in Japanese-Hitsujigaoka-translates to "hill of sheep"

The area was once so popular, visitors had to be regulated until the smaller Observation Hill was opened

The original bust of Dr. Clark at the Hokkaido University was similarly popular, resulting in the now-iconic statue at Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill

How to Get There

Hitsujigaoka Observation Hill is accessible by car, bus, and subway.

Transit by subway is available year-round. Take the Toho line to Fukuzumi Station (35 minutes), then transfer to the number 84 bus (10 minutes) and alight at the Hitsujigaoka bus stop.

A note: between April and November, bus offers the most direct access. From Sapporo Station , simply take the number 89 bus (40 minutes).

For those arriving by car, free parking is available.

Boys, be ambitious!

Dr. William S. Clark, an American professor, was invited by the Japanese government in 1876 to help establish the Sapporo Agricultural College (now the Hokkaido University). His knowledge and teaching had a lasting impact on Hokkaido's colonization and he remains an important figure for the prefecture today. Snapping a photo while replicating his statue's famous pose is a must for visitors to Hitsujigaoka.

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