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    I love ramen. Not the instant stuff served in Styrofoam cups, but the fresh noodles served in a bowl of rich soup stock topped with…

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Kirishima-jingu Shrine 霧島神宮

Kirishima Shrine
Kirishima Shrine

A beautifully ornate temple known as the Nikko of the West

One of Japan's oldest Shinto shrines, Kirishima-jingu Shrine is called the Nikko of the West for its stunning vermillion facade and detailed, colorful reliefs, which contrast with the surrounding greenery.

Quick Facts

The surrounding mountains are where the god Ninigi no Mikoto is said to have descended from heaven to rule the earth

The current shrine has been rebuilt several times after being destroyed by volcanic activity

How to Get There

The shrine is accessible by train, bus, or car.

Kirishima-jingu Shrine is in walking distance of Kirishima-jingu Station and a short drive from Kirishima Onsen.

Descended from heaven

According to Japanese mythology, Ninigi no Mikoto, grandson of the sun goddess Amaterasu, descended to earth at the peak of nearby Mt. Takachiho and married a local princess, thus becoming a mortal. This ancient shrine was constructed around the sixth century in his honor.

The shrine was originally located at the foot of the sacred Mt. Takachiho, but after being repeatedly burned down by volcanic eruptions, it was moved to its current location. The shrine, which was rebuilt in 1715, is an Important Cultural Property of Japan.

Ancient roots, spiritual energy

An 800-year-old cedar tree next to the main shrine building is testament to the roots of this spiritual spot, and you can almost feel the ancient energy in the air. Make sure to walk behind the ornately decorated main building to the lesser-visited shrines for a more personal encounter with the mountain god.

If you're feeling adventurous, a visit to the shrine's original location at Takechihogawara, which is also the start of the Kirishima hiking trail, is recommended. On the tenth of each month, a Shinto ceremony is held by priests from Kirishima-jingu Shrine, and the desolate location is reminiscent of a scene from an Akira Kurosawa movie.

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