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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Eat & Drink

Nagasaki Chinatown 長崎新地中華街

One of Japan's three largest Chinatowns

A criss-cross of shop and restaurant-filled lanes stretching over a block in downtown Nagasaki, Japan's oldest Chinatown provides a riveting insight into one of the country's earliest immigrant cultures.

Don't Miss

  • Chinese food, as reinvented for Japanese tastes
  • Celebrate Chinese New Year with a bang at the Nagasaki Lantern Festival

How to Get There

Get off at Tsukimachi on the Nagasaki green and blue tram lines. From here you should be able to see the Shinchi Chinatown entrance.

Culture's long-lasting reach

Along with the Dutch, the Chinese were the only traders allowed to settle in Nagasaki during Japan's long period of isolation from the 17th to the end of the 19th century. With over 10,000 residents living in the city at the peak of trade, Chinese culture has done nothing but enrich Nagasaki, its influences permeating and carrying through to the modern day.

A wonderful example is the Nagasaki Lantern Festival, started by settlers to celebrate Chinese New Year. A not-to-be-missed event and famous for vividly colored illuminations that transform the city's landscape, the festival is the largest Chinese New Year Celebration in Japan.

Guardian gates

When approaching Shinchi China Town, the first thing you will see are the large red gates. Markers from which to explore the tranquil neighborhood within, wander the atmospheric lanes and keep your eye out for Chinese-style temples and other buildings.

Constructed by Chinese craftsmen with materials from Fuzhou, China, the gates boast their own guardian of the four directions. Look out for an azure dragon in the east; to the west, a white tiger; to the south, a vermillion bird; and to the north, a black tortoise.

Building up an appetite

Famed for the Chinese-influenced dishes of chanpon and sara udon, Nagasaki's Chinatown is the best place to sample these unique foods. Other notable delicacies to look out for are yori-yori, a bread-like sweet that is beautifully twisted before it is baked. For something more familiar, don't miss kakuni manju, steamed buns with Chinese braised pork inside.

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