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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

HOKKAIDO Niseko & Nearby Ski Resorts

Perfect powder draws skiers from around the world

Hokkaido is known for its snow, but the Niseko area, southwest of Sapporo, is the most famous ski area in Japan, popular with overseas visitors for its powdery snow and welcoming attitude. Beyond the snow season, there are hiking trails and sports from rafting to golf.

Don't Miss

  • Soak in one of the many local hot springs
  • Snap a photo of iconic Mt. Yotei, that looks like Mt Fuji
  • Enjoy backcountry skiing and snowboarding through pristine wilderness

How to Get There

Niseko is accessible from Sapporo or New Chitose International Airport by car, train or bus.

The drive from Sapporo or the airport takes around three hours. There are buses from both points and trains via Otaru to Niseko Station. Local taxis are often equipped with ski racks for convenience.

Skiing and snowboarding

Niseko is the powder snow capital of Hokkaido. As the largest resort on the island, a huge variety of terrain and facilities are available to suit all levels. Niseko United is the largest area, comprising four resorts. Rental equipment is available from local stores for those traveling without gear. Smaller resorts like Niseko Moiwa provide a chance to enjoy the freshest powder away from the crowds.

Backcountry and cat skiing

For adventurous skiers and snowboarders who want to get off the beaten track, Niseko has numerous backcountry guided tours and cat-skiing options, such as Chisenupuri, Weiss, and Shimamaki. The professionals will outfit you in the necessary safety gear and instill the rules of alpine safety. Adding a rugged sense of adventure to your Niseko experience, consider trying to conquer the majestic Mt. Yotei.

Other winter activities

Try snowmobiling to get your heart racing, or try the old school charms of snowshoeing. You can even be pulled through the powder by happy huskies - there are a great many activities for those seeking variety.

At the end of the day, there is nothing better than soaking in one of the many natural hot springs.

Summer in Niseko

Switch your snowboard for a mountain bike to enjoy the mountains in summer or head to one of the many local golf courses. Rafting and stand-up paddle boarding are a great way to see the waterways or scope out a fishing spot. Pop by the Michi-no-Eki road stop for summer produce and locally made gelato.

Eat, drink and be merry

The ski villages have restaurants and bars to suit all tastes. Hirafu—the largest village—is home to the majority of establishments. The international feel of the area makes apres-ski a must.

For dining, you can enjoy anything from Michelin-starred restaurants and high-class Japanese cuisine to comfort food. Try the local potatoes, tofu, soba, and Hokkaido seafood.

A place to stay

From traditional style Japanese “ryokan” inns and bed and breakfasts to gleaming hotels and modern apartments, there is a wide range of accommodation options to suit you any budget in Niseko. Whether you prefer the hustle and bustle of a backpackers' hostel or your own private hotel room, get in quick while rooms are available.

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