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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Sub-zero temperatures and the greatest of outdoor environments, complemented by sizzling soul food and warm-hearted welcomes. Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Sleek apple-red and electric-green shinkansen whisk you up to a haven of fresh powder snow, fresh fruit and fearsome folk legends Fearsome festivals, fresh powder and vast fruit orchards—the rugged northern territory of Tohoku offers a fresh perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
Mountains and sea meet in one of Japan's wildest regions, and the result is sheer beauty. Once largely inaccessible, Hokuriku is now reachable by shinkansen from Tokyo in a matter of hours An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Characterized by the constant buzz of the world's most populous metropolitan area, the Kanto region is surprisingly green with an array of escapes that include mountainous getaways and subtropical islands Experience diversity at its fullest, from the neon of Tokyo to the ski slopes of Gunma, exotic wildlife of the Ogasawara Islands and cultural heritage of Kamakura
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Served by the shinkansen line that connects Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka, the Tokai region provides plenty of interesting diversions and easy excursions Tokai means "eastern sea," and this region stretches east from Tokyo to Kyoto and includes blockbuster attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
From raucous nights out to outdoor thrills to peaceful reverie, trying to categorize the Kansai region is a futile task The Kansai region is one of extreme contrasts—the neon lights of Osaka and glittering Kobe nightscape, the peaceful realms of Shiga, Wakayama and Nara, and the cultured refinement of Kyoto
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Less-traveled and delightfully inaccessible at times, the Chugoku region is a reminder that the journey is sometimes more important than the destination Welcome to Japan's warm and friendly western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Providing the stage for literary classics, fevered dancing and natural wonders Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
Easily reached by land, sea and air, the dynamic Kyushu prefectures are bubbling with energy, culture and activity The southern island of Kyushu is home to volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky, succulent seafood, steaming hot springs and the country's hottest entrepreneurial town
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Ruins and recreated castles of the Ryukyu kings nestle amid magnificent beaches in Okinawa, a diver's paradise teeming with an amazing array of coral and undersea life Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Currency

Currency and currency exchange

If you don’t exchange any currency into yen before coming to Japan, you can do so once you arrive in the country. All major airports have exchange points in their respective arrivals halls. Even though it is possible to buy train tickets, take taxis, and pay for most other services on offer at the airport with international credit cards, carrying some cash is recommended. You will definitely need some during your stay.

Yen comes in 1,000 yen, 2,000 yen, 5,000 yen and 10,000 yen denominations and coins in 1 yen, 5 yen, 10 yen, 50 yen, and 500 yen. While the 10,000 yen note is equivalent to around 100 dollars, the note is generally accepted even if buying something small. Be aware that not many 2,000 yen notes are in circulation. They are accepted, but can be easily confused with the 1,000 yen note, so make sure you get the correct change after using them.

When entering or leaving Japan, a customs declaration is required if you are carrying more than one million yen in cash, checks, travelers checks, securities etc. Refer to the official website of Japan customs for a comprehensive understanding of any necessary procedures.

ATM Information

Japan’s four major airports—Narita Airport Haneda Airport Chubu Centrair International Airport and Kansai International Airport — have ATMs where cash can be dispensed. ATM service fees may be charged when withdrawing money, depending on the hour or day.

Foreign currency can usually be exchanged at exchange counters, banks, and some hotels, and World Currency Shops are dotted around the country. Exchange rates fluctuate daily in accordance with financial market trends. Currency that can be exchanged depends on the exchange counter.

Banks

You can also exchange foreign currency at major banks. Branches generally have convenient locations—often in front of train stations—however, be aware that many close at 3 p.m. Research the major banks in Japan—The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ , Mizuho Bank , Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation —and the Japan Post Bank .

Exchange Corners / Discount Ticket Shops / Automatic Change Machines / Foreign Exchange Delivery Services

Be aware that there are not many exchange corners outside major cities, however in most cases, large hotels offer exchange services. Alternatively, research the currency exchange services provided by Travelex and the currency exchange machine service by Nippon Express . Some discount ticket shops in urban areas may also provide this exchange service. For those unfamiliar with discount ticket shops, they purchase tickets such as concert tickets and train tickets, and sell them at lower prices.