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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Working Visa & Working Holiday Visa

Working Visa

The visa you will require depends on your reason for being in Japan. While visitors from many countries don't need a visa for a 90-day (or less) sight-seeing based stay, the rules change if you are planning to work or engage in any kind of activity that involves remuneration.

Japan's official site for immigration should be your first point of reference for any immigration procedures related to working visas.

Generally speaking, a visa sponsor is required if you want to work in Japan. The type of work you can do is restricted to that which requires high level skills or professional knowledge. The types of activities that can be engaged in covers a wide range—from a diplomat to an entertainer—however, in each case, a visa is granted based on whether a contribution to the Japanese economy can be made or not. Private research into the kinds of business activities that are authorized and the necessary requirements to obtain a visa should be made.

Working Holiday Visa

If you are interested in a longer stay in Japan and want to engage in employment to supplement your travel, research the possibility of obtaining a Working Holiday Visa.

A number of countries hold a bilateral agreement with Japan to allow travelers up to the age of 30 (in most cases) to live and work in Japan for a set period of time. Many conditions apply—including nationality, the kind of work that can be undertaken, and having the funds to support a long period of stay in Japan—and these conditions continue to change and evolve. Thorough research is required to find out the latest and necessary information regarding eligibility. Start by reading through Japan's official Ministry of Foreign Affairs site about obtaining a Working Holiday Visa for Japan .

Longer Stays Program

With the introduction of the Longer Stays Program, it is now possible to stay in Japan for up to one year. To be eligible, foreign nationals and accompanying spouses must be from countries/regions to which Japan implements visa exemption measures—children are not allowed to accompany. Foreign nationals must be over the age of 18, and have savings that equate to 30 million Japanese yen. If the applicant's spouse does not apply as an accompanying traveler and wishes to stay separately under this program, the applicant and his/her spouse must own savings equivalent to more than 60 million Japanese yen in total.

Subscription to a private medical travel insurance policy which covers death, injury and illness during his/her stay. The period of stay is six months. However, it can be extended to one year with a Permission for Extension of Period of Stay (available only once). It is necessary to obtain a specified visa of Designated Activities in advance from Japanese embassies or consulates that exercise jurisdiction over the applicant's domicile to enter Japan under this program.

Foreign nationals who stay for a mid-long term in Japan—including those under this program—are required to go through all relevant procedures at a municipal office . Contact the Immigration Information Center for further information. A multilingual service is available.