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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Kashihara 橿原

## The site of one of Japan's earliest, grandest imperial capitals

Kashihara in rural Nara Prefecture is a quiet place steeped in history and conveniently close to another ancient capital, Asuka.

Don't Miss

  • The grand Kashihara-Jingu Shrine, thought to be the site of Japan's founding
  • The picturesque old merchant quarter of Imaicho

How to Get There

Kashihara is accessible by train to Kashihara-jingu-mae.

From Tokyo or Kyoto: Take the JR Tokaido Shinkansen to Kyoto Station. Change to the Kintetsu Line, which has a rapid express train that reaches Kashihara-jingu-mae in about an hour.

From Osaka: From Abenohashi Station in Osaka, it takes an hour on the Kintetsu Minami-Osaka Line to reach Kashihara-jingu-mae Station.

From Nara: From Kintetsu Nara Station, it takes about 50 minutes on the Kintetsu Line to reach Kashihara-jingu-mae Station via Yamato-Saidaiji.

Discover Kashihara's transition through 1,000 years of history

Fujiwara-kyo in modern-day Kashihara was the imperial capital for a mere 16 years between 694 and 710. The imperial palace site is now covered by fields of seasonal flowers. Fujiwara Capital Museum offers a look at the area's past.

The three Yamato mountains

The three Yamato mountains of Mt. Kagu, Mt. Unebi, and Mt. Miminashi were incorporated into the old capital. They are celebrated in some of the oldest poetry anthologies and are still linked by pleasant walking trails.

Kashihara-jingu-mae

From Kashihara-jingu-mae Station, you can reach Kashihara-jingu Shrine within a few minutes on foot. It is dedicated to the first non-legendary emperor of Japan, Jimmu, and the site is hailed as the spot where he took the throne. After visiting the shrine building, stroll in its peaceful surroundings, which include a large lake.

Edo-period atmosphere attraction

Skip forward ten centuries and you find Imaicho, a mere 20-minute walk north of the shrine. This atmospheric Edo-period merchant quarter has some 500 traditional buildings still intact, many of which have been converted into shops and cafes.

Kashihara is a short train ride away from the archaeological sites, temples, and burial mounds at Asuka, which served as the capital prior to Fujiwara-kyo.

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