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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Nature

Enoshima 江ノ島

Enoshima Island—more than just fun in the sun

Enoshima Island is home of the Naked Goddess, the deity of entertainment. This may be one reason why it is considered home to a fun-loving beach community and the sightseeing couples that visit especially in the summertime.

Don't Miss

  • A trip to Enoshima Candle for a dose of good fortune
  • Night views from Enoshima Candle—an observation lighthouse
  • Dancing with dragons in Enoshima Iwaya Cave

How to Get There

Get close to Enoshima by train from the Tokyo and Yokohama area, or from nearby Kamakura, and walk onto the island.

Enoshima is connected to the mainland by a bridge near which two train lines and a monorail run.

Enoshima Station on the Enoden Line, Katase Enoshima Station on the Odakyu Line, and Shonan Enoshima Station on the Shonan Monorail Line are all a short walk from the island. The Enoden Line is the most convenient if traveling from Kamakura.

Daytripper

Enoshima Island is a small island to the west of Kamakura, connected to the mainland by a 600-meter bridge.

It has long been a popular destination for day-tripping Tokyoites and was particularly popular during the Edo Period (1603-1867), especially among people who worked in the entertainment industry such as kabuki actors. Today it is a bustling island mixing traditional and modern, packed with shops, inns, restaurants, and sightseeing spots.

Fish to catch and see

The mainland has developed to cater for visitors, boasting an aquarium and many shops and restaurants, as well as beaches where you can swim – swimming off the island of Enoshima itself is prohibited.

The area is popular with fishermen and windsurfers. On a clear day, Mount Fuji is visible to the northwest, perched on the horizon.

Benefits of Enopass

The Enopass ticket costs 1000 yen and gives access to the cave, lighthouse, and garden, and it gives the bearer access to the escalators that criss-cross the forested hill that accounts for the majority of the island. It entitles you to discounts at various attractions and businesses on the mainland.

Enoshima-jinja Shrine

Enoshima-jinja Shrine was built to worship the prosaic deities of fishing and sea transport. But soon, the shrine became synonymous with the gods of music, money, and good fortune. And, fittingly, it is Hadaka-Benten, the Naked Goddess, that is by far the most famous of Enoshima's gods.

Worshipped by entertainers throughout the Edo Period (1603-1867), even today celebrities in need of a little divine inspiration periodically pray here to the Naked Goddess.

Three for one

Enoshima-jinja is actually a collection of three shrines scattered across the island. Hetsunomiya shrine is the first on the trail, originally built in 1206, and it is here that Hadaka Benten is enshrined. A little further on is Nakatsunomiya, founded in 853. Beyond that sits Okutsunomiya. This shrine dates from 1841 after the original was destroyed in a storm.

Enoshima Candle

Rising from the center of the island is Enoshima Candle, a lighthouse observation tower from which you can enjoy a gorgeous panoramic view. 120 meters up, the view at any time is amazing, but at night it is particularly stunning.

Other attractions

On the ocean side of the island is Enoshima Iwaya, two caves created by natural erosion and a favorite spot of Minamoto no Yoritomo (1147-1199), the shogun who erected the famous Tsurugaoka Hachimangu in its current location in Kamakura. A dragon was believed to haunt this area and the second cave is dedicated to the myth.

Rest and romance

If all the climbing has tired you out, Enoshima Island Spa offers restorative hot spring baths (some are mixed, so swimwear is required). For couples, the Love Bell is a must. Together, ring the bell and leave your names on a lock attached to the fence to ensure a love everlasting.

Set aside a minimum of a few hours to view Enoshima Island at leisure. But if you fancy an ocean swim, a beachside cafe, or a relaxing soak in the onsen, then plan for a whole day or even overnight to fully enjoy the island.

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