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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Attraction

Oita Bank Dome 大分銀行ドーム

The architectural jewel in Oita's sporting and entertainment crown

Designed by the famed architect Kisho Kurokawa, the Oita Bank Dome is a world-class multipurpose stadium that can accommodate 40,000 people. Nicknamed "Big Eye" because the movement of its retractable roof resembles the blinking of a human eye, the dome is mostly used for major sporting events, and serves as the home field of the J. League soccer club Oita Trinita.

Architecture Week magazine called this structure the best arena design on the planet in 2001.

Don't Miss

  • Taking in a Rugby World Cup game in 2019
  • The bold design by architect Kisho Kurokawa
  • Going to a live concert

How to Get There

Located not far from Oita's major station, the Dome is easily accessible by car and public transport.

There are shuttle buses available for guests traveling between the Oita Bank Dome and Oita Station. Oita Station is served by the Kyudai, Hohi and Nippo Main lines, offering access to much of Kyushu.

Dome details

When Oita Stadium opened in May 2001, it had a capacity of 43,000. After the 2002 FIFA World Cup ended, 3,000 movable seats were removed, so its current capacity is 40,000. Over the years the space has hosted a number of events including soccer, rugby and track and field meets as well as concerts and exhibitions.

The architect behind the building

Even if you're not a fan of sports, it's worth visiting the Dome for its architectural pedigree. Created by renowned architect Kisho Kurokawa, the structure is a prime example of the Japanese architectural movement known as the Metabolist Movement. Founded by Kurokawa and a number of contemporaries, this postwar design movement is all about fusing organic biological growth and architectural mega-structures, a design ideology you can see quite clearly in this stadium.

Hosting major international matches

The site of the FIFA World Cup in 2002, the Oita Bank Dome complies with FIFA standards and was certified as a Class 1 Competition Facility for track and field tournaments. The stadium hosted three FIFA World Cup matches in 2002. It was selected as one of the venues for the upcoming 2019 Rugby World Cup, which will be the first Rugby World Cup to be held in Asia.

Events year-round no matter the weather

The all-weather dome is equipped with a sliding semitransparent roof that opens and closes, allowing natural light to flood through. This means that no matter the weather outside the stadium provides a bright, natural playing field or venue for other events.

Keywords

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