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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Miho-jinja Shrine 美保神社

An ancient shrine beloved by musicians in a sleepy, historic fishing village

More than a hundred years ago, when Lafcadio Hearn visited Mihonoseki, it was a bustling port filled with sailors drinking, gambling, and consorting with geisha and dancing girls. He described it as “one of the noisiest and merriest little havens of Western Japan.“

Now it is a sleepy fishing village, with Miiho-jinja Shrine the reason most people visit, and is a special favorite of musicians. They also enjoy grilled squid or soy sauce-flavored ice cream, both local specialties.

Don't Miss

  • Unique collection of musical instruments in the shrine's treasure house
  • The views from Miho Lighthouse
  • Soy sauce-flavored ice cream

How to Get There

You can get to the shrine by bus or car.

Mihonoseki is the last stop of a 40-minute bus ride from Matsue Station. The bus from nearby Sakaiminato takes only 15 minutes via the Sakaisuido Bridge.

If you come by car, you'll be able to drive along the coast road that runs in and out of the very scenic, small coves and the headlands of the peninsula's north coast.

A musical shrine

Most people coming to Mihonoseki nowadays come to visit the Miho Shrine, the head shrine of more than 3,000 Ebisu shrines nationwide. Ebisu is one of the Seven Lucky Gods of Japan, and is particularly popular with fishermen, children, and commercial businesses.

Because Ebisu loved music, people have left offerings of musical instruments at the shrine. The treasure house now contains a fantastic assortment of almost 900 instruments, both Japanese and Western, some quite rare and unusual, like the first accordion in Japan.

On the seventh of every month, the treasure house opens and a selection are put on public display

Miho Lighthouse

From the nearby Miho Lighthouse, at the very tip of the peninsula, you have fantastic views out to sea and across to Mount Daisen. Built in 1898, it is the oldest stone lighthouse in the region.

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