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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan. Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan.
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare. An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare.
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife. Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife.
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan. Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan.
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara. The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara.
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower. Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower.
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving. Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving.
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky. The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky.
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Atsuta-jingu Shrine 熱田神宮

Tranquility, gods and a sacred sword

One of Japan's three most important Shinto shrines, Atsuta Jingu is the religious heart of Nagoya , and was reportedly founded 1,900 years ago. The fertile Owari Plain has inspired locals to see the shrine as the protector of agriculture, and many of the festivals and divine services here focus on cultivation.

Legends are at the core of this shrine's appeal, with the tale of a sacred relic and the influence of the gods among them.

Quick Facts

Atsuta Jingu is the second-largest shrine in Japan

The shrine receives millions of visitors every year

How to Get There

Atsuta-jingu Shrine is easy to reach by train.

The shrine is a five-minute walk from Jingu-mae Station on the Meitetsu Line, or a 12-minute walk from JR Atsuta Station on the JR Tokaido Line. Both lines can be accessed from Nagoya Station .

A home to legends

When the god Susanoo had to slay an eight-headed serpent, he did so with the help of his legendary sword, Kusanagi-no-Tsurugi. Some 1,900 years ago, that sword, one of the three items of the Imperial Regalia of Japan, was enshrined here at Atsuta Jingu.

Unfortunately, you cannot see the sword itself, since only the emperor and a few select priests are permitted access to such fabled treasures. Nonetheless, there are still many reasons to visit this magnificent shrine.

Natural beauty and sweet surprises

Atsuta Jingu is set within a sprawling, sun-dappled cedar grove. As you wander through the trees—the scent of foliage mingling with incense—you'll find yourself forgetting all aspects of modern life outside the shrine walls.

Hidden places of worship

After exploring the imposing main shrine, stroll the grounds and discover hidden places of worship in the form of miniature shrines tucked away in secluded corners and copses. Keep an eye out for romantic couples dressed in their very best, since Atsuta Jingu is a popular spot for ceremonies and photos.

Atsuta Jingu's stature as a shrine for the powerful is reinforced by the remains of a wall donated by the mighty samurai warlord Oda Nobunaga. If you feel your own power waning, head to the Kiyome Chaya teahouse to refuel with green tea and Kiyome mochi rice cakes.

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