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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

History

Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine 鶴岡八幡宮

## The 800+-year-old shrine that is the heart of Kamakura

Dedicated to Hachiman, the patron god of samurai, this beautiful shrine has existed for over 800 years. Enjoy a peaceful respite and the gorgeous views on the approach.

How to Get There

The shrine is easily accessible by public transportation.

From Tokyo, take the JR Yokosuka Line for about an hour. Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine is a 10-minute walk from JR Kamakura Station.

Quick Facts

Wakamiya Shrine, located in the gardens, was restored in 1624

Two beautiful ponds represent the Taira and Kamakura clans

The whole shrine was moved in 1180

The spirit of samurai

In 1063, the head of the Minamoto clan, Yoriyoshi, created Tsurugaoka Hachimangu to thank the gods for victory in battle. His descendant, Yoritomo, moved the shrine to its current location in 1180 when he made Kamakura his home and the de facto capital of Japan during the Kamakura period, 1192–1333. By shifting power to the east from Kyoto and establishing the idea of the military rule, known as the shogunate, Yoritomo began an era that would continue until 1868.

Stroll around the beautiful ponds

Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine is inextricably linked with nearly a century of Japanese history and culture. Today, the shrine, which stands at the center of Kamakura, is widely considered the soul of the city. You enter through many massive red torii gates that stretch through the center of Kamakura. On either side of the wide road leading up to the shrine are two ponds, representing the Minamoto clan, who founded the shrine and the Kamakura Shogunate, and the Taira, their bitter rivals. The gardens beside the Minamoto pond are beautiful all year.

Also starring

A stone staircase leads you to the shrine itself. Alongside the shrine is a museum devoted to its history. Other attractions include the Maiden stage, where dance performances take place, and the Wakamiya shrine, which was restored in 1624 by the Tokugawa Shogunate in recognition of the dynasty that predated them.

Festivals

In April, a massive festival centered around the shrine attracts thousands of visitors, as does the yabusame horseback archery festival in September.

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