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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

SHIZUOKA Hamamatsu Great lake activities, and the place to go for eel, fruit and flowers

Great lake activities, and the place to go for eel, fruit and flowers

Hamamatsu, situated on the western side of Shizuoka, is one of Japan's most productive manufacturing hubs. That's not all there is to this area, of course. There is plenty of recreational fun on offer thanks to the nearby Pacific, a river, mountains and a freshwater lake, Lake Hamana, with onsen resorts. Another draw is Hamamatsu Castle, built by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1570 and where he lived during his rise to power.

Don't Miss

  • Delicious Hamamatsu grilled eel
  • The Hamamatsu Museum, home to the city's musical history
  • The 100,000 blooms at Hamamatsu Flower Park
  • Cycling around Lake Hamana

How to Get There

Hamamatsu is easily accessible by shinkansen, regular train and bus, including buses from Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport.

Hamamatsu is a bullet train stop on the JR Tokaido Shinkansen, which is the most direct connection to Tokyo. Japan Rail Pass holders can access this train and other JR trains to the city. You can also take a Tomei Highway bus from Tokyo to Hamamatsu in from four to six hours. “E-wing” buses from Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport arrive in around 70 minutes.

Quick Facts

Lake Hamana is the birthplace of Japan's eel-farming industry

Global brands such as Honda, Yamaha, Kawai and Suzuki originated here

Hamamatsu landmark Act Tower resembles a giant harmonica

The famous Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616) built Hamamatsu Castle

Uncover the city's musical legacy

Hamamatsu is famous for its manufacturing. In fact, if you've ever bought a Japanese car, motorcycle, keyboard or other musical instrument, chances are it was lovingly manufactured right here in Hamamatsu.

Hamamatsu considers itself the town of music. If you make music or just love listening to it, plan a visit to the Hamamatsu Museum of Musical Instruments. Around 1200 musical instruments from around the world are displayed here. You can even play some of them.

The castle Tokugawa built

The legendary Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu lived in Shizuoka for almost all of his life. He built Hamamatsu Castle and lived here for 17 years. The castle and surrounding area is home to hundreds of cherry trees, a Japanese garden and expansive lawns for strolling and relaxing.

Taste Hamamatsu's most famous dish

Hamamatsu is famous for unagi, or freshwater eel, and you should try this healthy signature dish of the region while in Hamamatsu. The people love eel so much here that they started making cookies containing eel extract. They call them eel pies, and you can tour the factory that makes them not far from the city center — they're the perfect gift for foodies.

Fruit and flower parks

You'll find blooms and fruits in awe-inspiring numbers at the Hamamatsu Flower Park and Hamamatsu Fruit Park. The former offers 100,000 flowers and plants in 3000 varieties, and has greenhouse exhibits, shops and restaurants. The latter lets you pick fruit in season, has greenhouses filled with the park's fruit, and there are day camp areas and playgrounds.

Home to one of Japan's best lakes

If you're into marine sports, head for the lake that's one of Japan's most popular, Lake Hamana. You can swim, fish, sail, windsurf and more on this placid body of water. Onsen resorts Bentenjima and Mikkabi line the shores, and there's also a dedicated cycling path that runs alongside the lake for 48 kilometers. Bike rentals are available at various stations on the route.

Kite fights in the dunes

An unusual sight lies about 20 minutes away from Hamamatsu Station; sand dunes. The Nakatajima Dunes cover four kilometers along the Enshu Sea coastline. During the Hamamatsu Festival in early May, big kites battle on the sand, while at night elaborate floats roll through Hamamatsu's streets.

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