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Regions of Japan

Hokkaido Tohoku Hokuriku
Shinetsu
Kanto Tokai Kansai Chugoku Shikoku Kyushu Okinawa Islands SAPPORO TOKYO NAGOYA OSAKA FUKUOKA FURANO KUSHIRO AOMORI SENDAI FUKUSHIMA NIKKO HAKONE SADO TAKAYAMA KANAZAWA ISE KYOTO NARA HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI KAGOSHIMA NAHA
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
  • Hokkaido
Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush Japan's great white north offers wild, white winters and bountiful summers—a haven for dedicated foodies, nature lovers and outdoor adventure fans seeking an adrenaline rush
Tohoku
Tohoku
  • Aomori
  • Akita
  • Iwate
  • Yamagata
  • Miyagi
  • Fukushima
Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan Fearsome festivals, fresh powder snow and vast fruit orchards—the rugged territory of Tohoku offers a new perspective on travel in Japan
Hokuriku Shinetsu
Hokuriku Shinetsu
  • Niigata
  • Toyama
  • Ishikawa
  • Fukui
  • Nagano
An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare An easily accessible slice of rural Japan offering unrivaled mountainscapes and coastlines, endless outdoor adventure and amazing ocean fare
Kanto
Kanto
  • Tokyo
  • Kanagawa
  • Chiba
  • Saitama
  • Ibaraki
  • Tochigi
  • Gunma
Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife Jump from the neon glow of Tokyo to Gunma's mountain retreats, Kamakura's cultural heritage and the Ogasawara Islands' exotic wildlife
Tokai
Tokai
  • Yamanashi
  • Shizuoka
  • Gifu
  • Aichi
  • Mie
Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan Hallmark attractions such as Mt. Fuji and Takayama coexist with major cities and famous heritage in the center of Japan
Kansai
Kansai
  • Kyoto
  • Osaka
  • Shiga
  • Hyogo
  • Nara
  • Wakayama
The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara The Kansai region is one of contrasts, from the glittering lights of Osaka and Kobe to the cultural treasures of Kyoto and Nara
Chugoku
Chugoku
  • Tottori
  • Shimane
  • Okayama
  • Hiroshima
  • Yamaguchi
Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower Welcome to Japan's less-explored western frontier, where the weather is warmer and the pace of life is slower
Shikoku
Shikoku
  • Tokushima
  • Kagawa
  • Ehime
  • Kochi
Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving Island-hopping, cycling, soul-warming spiritual strolling and red-hot dancing—the island of Shikoku gets you up and moving
Kyushu
Kyushu
  • Fukuoka
  • Saga
  • Nagasaki
  • Oita
  • Kumamoto
  • Miyazaki
  • Kagoshima
The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky The southern island of Kyushu is home to hot springs, rugged geography, undeveloped beaches and volcanoes ranging from sleepy to smoky
Okinawa
Okinawa
  • Okinawa
Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings Fly to Okinawa and discover a distinct island culture born of subtropical sun, white sand, coral, mangrove jungles and the age of the Ryukyu Kings

Friendly people, fantastic seafood, and ramen, Japan's biggest festival, and pristine nature

Great food and even better company reign supreme in Fukuoka, the relaxed port town that is at the heart of life on Kyushu, Japan's third-largest island. The city is the fastest growing in Japan and has benefited throughout its history from its proximity to mainland Asia.

Don't Miss

  • Fukuoka cuisine: Fukuoka City has some of Japan's best food and is the home of tonkotsu ramen
  • Festivals: Fukuoka hosts Dontaku, Japan's largest festival, and innumerable smaller festivals
  • Nature: Fukuoka's compact size makes it a great place to enjoy both the sea and the mountains

How to Get There

Fukuoka is easily accessible from both Tokyo and Osaka via direct shinkansen or air. From Tokyo

Air: 1h 45 min from Haneda Airport to Fukuoka Airport.

Train: 4h 50 min from Tokyo Station to Hakata Station via the JR Tokaido-Sanyo Shinkansen Line.

From Osaka

Air: 1h 15 min from Itami to Fukuoka Airport.

Rail: 2h 20 min from Shin-Osaka to Hakata Station.

International
Fukuoka is well connected by sea and air to South Korea and is a short flight from Taiwan and Shanghai.

A tale of two cities

Fukuoka is Japan's fifth largest city and is nestled on the northern coast of Kyushu. The city is loosely divided into two halves, Hakata and Tenjin, with the island of Nakasu in the middle. Formerly these areas used to be two separate cities: the merchant town of Hakata to the east and the castle town of Fukuoka (which included Tenjin) to the west. The cities merged in 1889 to create the modern city of Fukuoka.

Nowadays, Hakata is Fukuoka's business hub and is the terminus for the bullet train line that runs from Tokyo.

Hakata Station is one of Fukuoka's main transport hubs, and the airport is only six minutes away by subway. The Tenjin area is Fukuoka's cultural center, with a million and one boutique shops, restaurants and bars. Nakasu, meanwhile, is the city's sometimes glitzy, sometimes gritty entertainment heart and only truly comes to life after dark.

Fukuoka's warmth, both the positivity of the locals and the temperature, has led to the city being described as the Mediterranean of Japan. The city is actually closer to Seoul and Shanghai than it is to Tokyo, meaning many visitors to Japan never make it to Fukuoka. However, if you're looking for a more relaxed city to spend some time in than Tokyo, Kyoto or Osaka, Fukuoka is for you.

Delicious ramen and fish dishes

Fukuoka is renowned across Japan for its good and cheap food. A bowl of tonkotsu ramen here will set you back as little as 280 yen in some restaurants, while the city's street-side yatai stalls draw crowds from across Japan and Asia. If you're a fan of sushi and sashimi, then you must try saba (mackerel), a Fukuoka specialty.

Festival fun

The Hakata Dontaku is held every year in May during Golden Week. It is the most popular Golden Week festival in Japan, with 2 to 3 million people attending the festival every year. The Hakata Gion Yamakasa, held each July, sees one-ton floats being raced through the streets of Hakata. Besides these two giants, innumerable smaller festivals take place throughout the year within the city and in the surrounding areas.

Getting around

The city has good local public transport with a rapid subway system and well-connected local buses. For more regional travel within Kyushu and Japan, Hakata Station is the main point of focus, with a large bus terminal and Fukuoka City's bullet train station.

The airport is conveniently located, and travel to the city center by subway from the domestic terminal takes only six minutes. Regular bus services also run to the airport, connecting it to both the city and the rest of Kyushu.

The Hakata Port Passenger Terminal connects the city to some of Kyushu's most remote islands and internationally to South Korea, with a regular ferry service to the Korean City of Busan that takes as little as two hours.

Gateway to Kyushu

Many who come to Fukuoka City use it as the gateway city to see all Kyushu. The city is well-connected to other major cities in Kyushu such as Nagasaki, Kagoshima, Beppu, and Kumamoto. Bus services run to these cities from both the Hakata and Tenjin Bus Terminals, while local and long distance trains through Kyushu run from Hakata JR Station. Many connections within Fukuoka Prefecture are available through the use of local Nishitetsu transport services including the local bus, train, and subway lines.

Breathtaking beaches and mountains

Fukuoka's relatively small size means that it is incredibly easy to get out to the nearby mountains and beaches. The Momochihama Beach area includes one of Fukuoka's main attractions, Fukuoka Tower. Meanwhile, during the summer, locals flock to the nearby Itoshima Peninsula for BBQs, swimming and water sports. Itoshima is home to a number of hikes, but one of the city's best,

Kyushu's seat of government for five centuries

Built back in the 7th century, the quiet little town of Dazaifu was once Kyushu's administrative heart. The ruins of the government offices are still here, as are many major temples and shrines such as Tenmangu and Kanzeonji. Tenmangu is the top shrine dedicated to scholars and scholarship and enshrines Sugawara Michizane (845-903), considered the god of academic achievement. This is where students facing exams come to pray for success.

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